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Everyone in the workplace benefits from the value of diversity. Learn more about our Ready, Willing and Able employment campaign: inclusionbc/ready-willing-and-able.

Meet Olivia, Devon, Kayla and Kit on the "on my way" video blog. Share in the journey of these four students as they plan for life after high school. Visit transitionplanningbc.ca

Watch this video montage to experience the unique culture of celebration and full inclusion found at Inclusion BC's annual conference.

On November 21, Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute released a new report on a survey of parents on the use of restraint and seclusion in BC schools. Click here to read the full report. 

Say No to Institutions! Inclusion BC remains concerned that the George Pearson Center redevelopment threatens to institutionalize people with disabilities. Learn more here.

 This August, join a three-day conference at UBC on inclusive education for educators, parents and school teams. More info:  http://bcinclusivelearning.com/

History of Inclusive Education

The fundamental right of children with developmental disabilities to receive an education was the first issue to mobilize the community living movement in the 1950s. At the time, it was widely believed that children with developmental disabilities could not learn. The government, therefore, accepted no responsibility for their education. Parents of children with developmental disabilities, understanding the potential of their sons and daughters to learn and grow, responded by creating their own schools in places like church basements and private homes.

In 1955 parents created a provincial organization, which eventually grew into the BC Association for Community Living, and now, Inclusion BC. Ever since, families have steadily advocated for changes in government laws and policies so that their children with disabilities would have the same right to be educated as other school-aged children.

Government slowly accepted responsibility for funding parent-run schools and eventually agreed that not just funding, but public schooling, should be available to children with disabilities. Although the first educational programs developed by school boards were segregated, they successfully laid the groundwork for parents and others to call for the inclusion of children in general education classes. The move to inclusive education throughout BC came in the late 1980s. Now, however, reduced funding for public education threatens to erode the gains that have been made in inclusive education.